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Mary Gertrude Colerider
Henry Clay Colerider
Edward Jackson Colerider

 

 

 

29. Edward Jackson Colerider (Married Jemima Reger (#30), 6 October 1842 in Harrison Co., WV by Francis Read, M.E. Minister. [Note: The location had to be in Virginia. West Virginia did not become a state until 1863]. Golden Wedding Anniversary 6 October 1892.(Source: a note in an old family photo book in the possession of Evelyn Sharpe Bumgarner, a Colerider Descendant, in 2009) See wedding record. (According to Virginia Marriages 1740-1850, 7 October 1842 in Lewis County). See The History of Upshur County, West Virginia From its Earliest Exploration and Settlement to the Present Time by William Bernard Cutright, 1907, p. 288 to see that the licence is confirmed for the year 1842. Source of green information is from Claudine Harding in numerous e-mails February and March 2009 to Susan L. Snyder. [Note: Claudine Harding is the GGGG Granddaughter of Rebecca Love (Eleanor Winnie Love's (#58) sister) and GGGGG Granddaughter of William Love (#115) and Winford Carney (#116)] .

Born: 1 November 1817, 1 November 1817 (Source: a note in an old family photo book in the possession of Evelyn Sharpe Bumgarner, a Colerider Descendant, in 2009) of Henry Colerider (#57) & Eleanor Winnie (Winford) Love (#58) at Buckhannon, Upshur County, W. Virginia [Note: It would have been Virginia at that time].
[Note: Claudine Harding....GGGG Granddaughter of Rebecca Love (Edward Jackson Colerider's aunt) and Edward H. Jackson (Edward Jackson Colerider's uncle) suspects that Edward Jackson Colerider was named after his uncle, Edward H. Jackson.]


Died: 27 November 1897, 26 November 1897 (Source: a note in an old family photo book in the possession of Evelyn Sharpe Bumgarner, a Colerider Descendant, in 2009) in Taylor County, W. Virginia (Buried Grafton, Taylor County, W. Virginia)
. He is buried with his wife at Bluemont Cemetery in Grafton West Virginia. (Source: Kathryn Nally Smith in a web query posting dated June 12, 2005). This is confirmed by Find-A-Grave photographs at the bottom of this page.

[His siblings included:

a) William L. Colerider: (Married 1: Cassie Ann (Cassa Ann) McWhorter 1 November 1841 in Harrison Co., W.V., Married 2: Sebra Kinkaid in Monongalia Co., W.V. on 22 December 1856 in Monongalia Co., W.V.; daughter of Moses Kinkaid and Rebecca Carothers.) Born: 1819 in Upshur County, W.V. Died: 14 February 1891 in Upshur Co., W.V. of heart failure at Hinkleville, buried 15 February 1891, Pleasant Valley, Upshur Co., W.V. [In the 1850 Census of Lewis County, Virginia William L. Colerider was 31 and a farmer. Listed with him were Casey A 31, Elenor 7, Amy J. 6, John M 5, and Henry 3. There was a W. L. Colerider listed in the 1860 Census of Buckhannon, Upshur, Virginia. W. L. Colerider was 41. Also listed with him were Sebra Colerider (22), Elinor (Elionor) Colerider (18), Annie (Amie T.) J. Colerider (16), John Colerider (15), Henry Colerider (13), and Rebecca K. Colerider (6 months old). W. L. was a farmer; Sebra was his wife; Elinor and Annie were domestics, and John was farming. W.L. and Edward lived in the same county and were about the same age.; the 1870 Census - Buckhannon, Upshur Co., W.V. lists William, 51, farmer, $2,500, $230, Sebre, 33; Rebecca K, 10; Willliam A, 8; Moses K, 4; Clark, 2; and Mary J., 3 months b. Feb; the 1880 Census - Meade, Upshur Co., W.V. lists Wm L, 61, farmer, b. W.V., father b. M.D., mother b. W.V., Sebra, 43, b. W. V., father b. Ireland, mother b. W.V.; Rebecca K, 20; Wm A, 18, farm laborer; Moses K, 14, farm laborer; Clark N, 12; Mary J, 10; Guy, 8; Sebra B, 2. A photograph of William and a letter from one of William's descendents, R. R. Colerider can be seen by clicking here. [Note: The locations for these events prior to 1863 had to have taken place in what was then the state of Virginia. West Virginia did not become a state until 1863.]

The History of West Virginia, Old and New Published 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, Volume III, pg. 503: Upshur: describes Moses K. Colerider, William's son. Within the description, it states, "William L. Colerider was a native of Upshur County, and his first wife was Cassie A. McWhorter. By this union there were four children: Elnora, widow of Stewart Hyre; Amy, widow of A.J. Hossaflook; John M., of California; and Henry, deceased. William L. Colerider was a Union soldier in the Civil War, and was wounded in battle and subsequently drew a pension from the Government. He was a republican in politics. His second wife, Sebra Kinkade, was born in Monongalia County, West Virginia, where she was reared and educated. She was the mother of eight children: Rebecca, widow of R.K. Waldow; W. A. of French Creek; Moses K., [Cl]ark, of Buckhannon; Guy, deceased; Mollie, wife of William Kiddy, of Sago, Upshur County; Belle, wife of James Smallridge, of Adrian; and Frank L., of Adrian.

b) Mary Cecelia Colerider: (Married: William H. Williams on 29 July 1852 in Monongalia County, W.V.) Born: 24 May 1832 in Upshur Co., W.V. Died: ? Children of Mary Colerider and William Williams are Marshall Foster Williams, Waitman T.L. Williams, and Ida Williams.] Click on The Pioneer -1976 to read more about William and Mary and their families. [Note: The locations for these events prior to 1863 had to have taken place in what was then the state of Virginia. West Virginia did not become a state until 1863.]


Miscellaneous:

In the 1840 United States Federal Census of Lewis County, Virginia, Henry Colerider #57 was listed as the head of his family. Living with him were two males 20 and under 30. Henry was listed as 50 and under 60. There was one female 5 and under 10, one 20 but under 30, and one 40 and under 50. The later was probably Henry's wife Eleanor #58. Edward was 23 at the time and listed as one of the "two males 20 and under 30."

Click on the image to see the 1840 census.

On November 15, 1840, Edward and 34 other men in the town of Buckhannon paid money to assure that a road would be built through the town. Edward's contribution to the cause was $20. The road was completed in 1847. To read about this project and Edward's involvement, as described in The History of Upshur County, West Virginia From its Earliest Exploration and Settlement to the Present Time by William Bernard Cutright, 1907 (pages 320 and 321), click here.

In 1848, there was a petitioned effort to establish a new Virginia county by taking away parts of Lewis, Harrison, Randolph and Barbour counties. The county seat of that new county (Upshur) would be Buckhannon Town. When Buckhannon Town was polled, Edward, his father (Henry) and his father-in-law (Henry Reger (#59) signed if favor of creating a new county. There was much debate within the surrounding communities, but finally on March 26, 1851, the county was created from parts of Lewis, Randolph and Barbour. To see a list of those who were living in Buckhannan and voted in favor of establishing a new county, as described in The History of Upshur County, West Virginia From its Earliest Exploration and Settlement to the Present Time by William Bernard Cutright, 1907 (pages 249 and 250), click here.

In the 1850 census for District 30 in Lewis, Virginia, Edward appears as Edward Collender. Birth Year: abt 1818; Birthplace: Virginia; Home in 1850: District 30, Lewis, Virginia; Family Number 242. Household Members include: Henry Collender (Henry Colerider #57): 68 (Farmer with value of real estate owned: $1000); Ellen Collender: 52; Edward Collender: 32 (Farmer); Mary Collender: 17; Elizabeth Collender: 33; Margaret Collender: 7; Barlow Collender: 5; Winford Collender: 3, and John W. Collender 1. [Note: This census, enumerated on the 13th day of July 1850 is very difficult to read. The identity of Ellen Collender, age 52 is Eleanor Love (Eleanor Winnie (Winford) Love (#58)), Henry's wife. Jemima (Edward's wife)(Jemima Reger (#30)), aged 24 at the time of the census is missing from the census and the identity of Elizabeth Collender, aged 33 is unknown. Mary is Edward's sister. Margaret, Barlow (Barbara Ellen), Winford, and John W. are Edward's and Jemima's children. To see a scanned copy of the original document, click on the census image.

In 1856, Edward J. Colerider was one of 19 Justices of the Peace elected by the people in the county. To read about his position, as described in The History of Upshur County, West Virginia From its Earliest Exploration and Settlement to the Present Time by William Bernard Cutright, 1907 (pages 249 and 250), click here.

In 1857, 1863, and 1864, Edward was serving as the Mayor and Recorder for the town of Buckhannon. This position was referred to as "President." To read about this position and see a listing of those who held that title from 1856 to 1870, as described in The History of Upshur County, West Virginia From its Earliest Exploration and Settlement to the Present Time by William Bernard Cutright, 1907 (page 278), click here.

On May 29, 1857 the Cooper's Clarksburg Register printed an article titled, "Railroad Meeting in Upshur County." Edward is listed as a committee member to help make arrangements for a convention to plan for the extension of the railroad to the Ohio River. The extension would help transport "productive resources and immense mineral and lumber wealth" of the counties lying within the proposed extension. To read this article and a transcribed version of same, click here.

As shown below in the Cooper's Clarksburg Register dated January 15, 1858, Edward is listed in a "Complainaut" in a legal suit to sell a house in Buckhannon. The same article appeared in that paper again on January 22, 1858.

Cooper’s Clarksburg Register, January 15, 1858

At Rules held in the Clerk’s office of the Circuit Court of Upshur county, on the first Monday in January, 1858, E.J. Colerider, Complainaut, vs. (In Chancery.) Vhomas G. Farnsworth, &c., Defendants.

The object of this suit is to obtain a decree to sell a certain house, shop, and lot in Buckhannon, for the purchase money due thereon.

It appearing that the defendant Thomas G. Farnsworth is not an inhabitant of this Commonwealth, it is ordered that he do apper here within one month after due publication of this order and do what is necessary to protect his interest In this suit. A copy. Teste,

A. POUNDSTONE, Clerk.
G. W. Berlin, attorney. jul 5 4t

 

In the 1860 Census of Buckhannon, Upshur, Virginia, enumerated on the 30th day of June, there were 11 people living in E. J. Colerider's home: E.J. Colerider: 42 (a mechanic), Jemima Colerider: 33 (wife) , Margaret Colerider: 15 (Domestic), Barbary E. Colerider: 13, Winfried C. Colerider: 11, Mary Colerider: 9, Virginia Colerider: 7, Henry C. Colerider (5), Alverta Colerider: 3, Sally T. Colerider: 1, and Melville Johnson: 18 (Town Shoemaker?...hard to read). The value of Edward's real estate was $3,000 and his personal estate was $200. Listed below this family was that of Henry Colerider (Henry Colerider #57): 79, (old and infirmed) and Eleanor (Eleanor Winnie (Winford) Love (#58)): 71 (wife). Henry was born in Maryland, Eleanor in Virginia. The value of his real estate was $200 and his personal estate: $500. Henry was Edward's father and Eleanor, his mother. [Note: According to other records of Eleanor's age, she would have been 61 in 1860, not 71]. To see a scanned copy of the original document, click on the census image.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated September 10, 1861, ran an article, "Congressional Meeting in Upshur County, Va." At the meeting, E. J. Colerider Esq., was called to the chair of a committee to appoint delegates to a convention to be held at Parkersburg to nominate a candidate for Congress for the 11th District of Virginia. On motion, E. J. Colerider was named as one of the 10 delegates to represent the county at the convention. To read the article in its entirety and a transcript of same, click here.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated May 2, 1862, printed an article titled, "Another Mass Meeting at Buckhannon, Upshur County, Va." The article described two meetings that took place. The first was on April 21st. The discussion was about how people in Buckhannon had been affected by guerrilla raids, On motion, E. J. Colerider, Esq., was called to the Chair. Another meeting took place on April 26th, with President E. J. Colerider leading the meeting. Discussion continued about the "unholy rebellion" being performed by the "secessionists" who were "taking the lives and property of the true and loyal citizens." During this meeting, many specific ways of dealing with these people were described, including the creation of a 12-man Vigilance Committee. To read the article in its entirety and a transcript of same, click here.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated August 12, 1862, printed an article titled, "Meeting at Buckhannon." The article described a meeting on August 2 for the purpose of making arrangements for a mass meeting of the county to call on able-bodied citizens to rally to their country's call to help crush the "unholy rebellion." The chairman of this meeting was E. J. Colerider. To read the article in its entirety and a transcript of same, click here.

At an extra session of the General Assembly of the State of Virginia that commenced on December 4, 1862, an act extended the corporation limits of the town of Buckhannon to include land owned by E. J. Colerider. Documentation appears in ACTS of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the STATE OF VIRGINIA, Passed at the EXTRA SESSION, Commenced December 1862, in the 87th year of the Commonwealth, Wheeling, JOHN F. M'DERMOT, PUBLIC PRINTER 1863, CHAP 3. Click here for details.

An important date that affected Edward and his family was when West Virginia was granted statehood, June 20, 1863. Until that date, the western region of Virginia was still part of Virginia. Once the region was granted statehood, West Virginia was a state loyal to the Union. [Note the location of Upshur County and the city of Buckhannon and north of that, Taylor County and the city of Grafton. These locations were where Edward lived at various stages of his life].

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated April 18, 1864, printed an article titled, "Upshur County Meeting." The article discussed the meeting that had been held to appoint delegates to the Convention that would be held in Parkersburg in April. Those delegates would appoint delegates to the National Convention in June to nominate Abraham Lincoln for reelection. In the article, E. J. Colerider is reported to have made two motions at the meeting, and was elected to be one of four delegates to represent Buckhannon at the April meeting. To read the article and a transcript of same, click here.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated October 6, 1864, printed an article titled, "From Buckhannon." In this article, 41 men, including E. J. Colerider, appealed to the Editors of the Intelligencer to urge the public to urge the government to send troops of protect the thousands of citizens in the county and surrounding counties. To date, the citizens of Buckhannon had been "assailed, robbed, and plundered" by rebels" five times. Without future protection, these men felt compelled to abandon their homes. To read the article in its entirety and a transcript of same, click here.

According to Kathryn Smith (G-G Granddaughter of Edward Colerider and Jemima Reger), stories have come down to her from her father (Great Grandson of Edward Colerider and Jemima Reger and Grandson of Flora): "The Coleriders lived in Buckhannon until Edward's cobbler shop was burned by the Confederate Army because he was suspected of Unionist activity. During this period, one of Edward's daughters, only about 8 or 10 at the time (Dad said her name was Birdie or Bertie, so I assume it was Alverta) stood upon a horseblock as the Confederate Army rode through Buckhannon and shouted 'You dirty-rotten Rebels.' Supposedly she was threatened by one of the soldiers but the commanding officer told his men that he saw her as an example of courage (wonderful story but truth is questionable).

After the cobbler's shop burned, they moved to Grafton. They were members of the same church in Grafton where Mother's Day began and in fact were good friends with Anna B. Jarvis, who started the holiday." (Source of information: e-mail messages to Susan Snyder March 17, 2009).

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated September 8, 1865, printed an article titled, "Federal Court." This article describes a federal court meeting in which Judge Jackson spoke. He reviewed the history of the past years and the overthrow of "rebellion and treason." He stated that the President [Lincoln] offered amnesty and pardoned "those who would come forward and renew their allegiance." The grand jurors and petit jurors of the U. S. Court were listed. E. J. Colerider is among those listed as petit jurors. To read the article in its entirety and a transcript of same, click here.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated January 31, 1866, printed a statement concerning a petition from E. J. Colerider for Mr. Budett to pay certain fines. The article and transcript are below:

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, January 31, 1866

Mr. Burdett presented the petition of E. J. Colerider. of Upshur county, praying to be released from certain fines imposed upon him. Received and referenced to the Finance Committee.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated May 25, 1868 printed information about the Republican Convention of Taylor county and listed the delegates to the State Convention. E. J. Colerider was one of the three delegates from Flemington. To read the article in its entirety and a transcript of same, click here.

Edward is listed in the 1870 West Virginia Census Index page 180 (WV56917825), enumerated on August 9th, as living in Elk Township in Harrison County. The listing includes: Edward J: 52, Boot & Shoemaker; Jemima: 44, keeping house; Mary E: 19, at school; Virginia M: 17, at school, Alverda: 13, at school; Henry C.:14, at school; Sallie T. : 9; Florence C.: 7. Eleanor: 71, at home. The value of Edward's real estate was $5,000 and his personal estate: $1,500. [Susan Snyder's note: Edward's father (Henry Colerider #57) does not appear in the 1870 census because he had died 7 to 8 years earlier, but Edward's mother Eleanor (Eleanor Winnie (Winford) Love (#58) is still alive.] To see a scanned copy of the original document, click on the census image.

The Democrat printed a short article about a "Land Sale" on October 3, 1870. The house and lot of Eleanor Colerider (#58) (Edward's mother) was to be sold to the highest bidder subject to her life estate. As a result of a circuit court decision in a clancery cause of the commissioner versus Edward J. Colerider and Joseph D. Rapp, the commissioner was holding the sale. The details of the "clancery cause" case is unknown. [Note: Eleanor was alive at the date of the scheduled sale in October.]

 

The Democrat, October 3, 1870

“Land Sale”

In pursuance of a decree rendered by the Circuit Court of Upshur County at the May term, 1870, in the chancery cause of John S. Fisher, commissioner, vs. Edward J. Colerider and Joseph D Rapp, I will, on the 19th day of October, 1870, that being a court for said county, at the front door of the Court House of said county, sell for cash in hand, to the highest bidder, the house and lot in the bill and proceedings in said cause mentioned. The house and lot will be sold subject to the life estate of Eleanor Colerider.

John S. Eisher, Commissioner
sep 12-41

 

Below: Family portrait of Edward and Jemima Colerider and their adult children: Front Row: Bertie Colerider, Virginia Colerider, Henry Clay Colerider (#15), Sallie (Sally) Colerider, Flora Colerider; Back Row: Maggie (Margaret) Colerider, Mary Colerider, Edward Jackson Colerider, Jemima Reger, Lum (Winifred) Colerider, and Ellen Colerider.

In the 1880 Census for Grafton, Taylor County, West Virginia, Edward is 62 and a boot and shoe maker. His birth place is listed as Virginia. His father's birthplace is Frankfort, Germany and his mother's birthplace is Virginia. Jemima is 53 and keeping house. She is listed as being born in Virginia, as were both her parents. Alvena J. is 22, Sallie T. is 21, Flora C. is 19. There are two boarders living at the home, Albert Shahan 27(brakeman, RR. Co.), and Thomas W. Davis 27 (carpenter, RR. Co.) Just below Edward's household on the census is Henry C. Colerider (#15), his son. Henry is the head of a household and 25 years old. He is a shoe maker. His wife, Alma (Anna Eliza Payne #16), 22, is keeping house. Albert Kelly, 18, is an apprentice and works in the shoe shop. [Note: There is a mistake in the census: Edward's father, Henry (#57), was not born in Germany. He was born in Maryland. Edward's grandfather, Henri Kaltreiter (#113) was born in Germany.] To see a scanned copy of the original document, click on the census image.

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, dated July 18, 1888, included a statement that Edward was visiting his daughter. That daughter was Margaret, who had married H. Douglas. The "People's Mutual Benefit Association" was an insurance company. Its plans included issuing of straight life and life maturity or endowment certificates.

 

The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, July 18, 1888

Mr. E. J. Colerider was in the city yesterday visiting his daughter, Mrs. Douglass, on the Island. Mr. Colerider represents the People’s Mutual Benefit Association, of Westerville, Ohio.

 

Below: Edward Colerider with his granddaughter, Mary Gertrude Colerider (#8) .

Edward and Jemima had 10 children in all, including 8 daughters and two sons: John Colerider, Bertie Colerider, Margaret L. Colerider (Married Douglas), Ellen B. Colerider (Married Dudley), Winefred C. Colerider (Married Shahan), Mary E. Colerider (Married Young), Virginia Minerva Colerider (Married Buzzell), Henry Clay Colerider (#15) (Married Anna Eliza Payne (#16)), Sally T. Colerider (Married Davis),and Flora Cecilia Colerider (Married Hesser).(#15). John died at 2 years of age.

Edward and Jemima, are buried at Bluemont Cemetery in Grafton, West Virginia. Find-A-Grave photograph credits are as follows: Photograph 1 of cemetery entrance: MKW, photographed on March 3, 2006; Photographs 2 and 3: D. G. Keener, photographed on November 23, 2011.

Below: Left: Edward J. Colerider 1817-1897 ---- Jemima His Wife 1826-1905. Below: Right: Edward J. Colerider 1817-1897

Lifetime Events Summary for Edward Jackson Colerider:

Event
Date
Edward's age
Birth
1 November 1817
0
Marriage
6 October 1842
~25
Children's births
1843-1859
26 - 42
26 January 1855
38
Age at Father's Death
~ 1862
~45
West Virginia became a State
1863
46
Age at Mother's Death
After 1870
over 53
Civil War
1861-1865
44 - 48
Death
27 November 1897
80

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Contact person for this website is Susan Snyder.