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Generation 8

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Helen Marie Sharpe
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Mary Elizabeth Donnell
Sarah P. Albright
Sarah Albright
Generation 8
John Ludwick Albright

 

 

111. John Ludwick (Ludwig) Albright (Married 1st: Mary Troxler on 1 April 1784; Married 2nd: Elizabeth "Betsy" Sharp (#112) 2 October 1787). The previous information in blue is confirmed by John's tombstone inscription and North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1781-1868 for Ludwick Albright.


Born: 19 February 1761 in Bern Twp., Berks County, Pennsylvania of Ludwig (Ludwick) (Lodowick) Albright (#221) & Anna Maria Keller (Anna Mariah Okeller=German spelling) (#222). [Source for the gray information is research done by Michael Cavenaugh (Glass family genealogist denoted on the Guilford County Genealogy Association Website)


Died: 29 April 1816 in Orange County, North Carolina. He is buried at
St. Paulís Lutheran Church Cemetery in Alamance, North Carolina. This was confirmed by a visit to the cemetery by Susan Snyder (#2) and her cousins Sandra Henson and Mary Lue Finch on 30 September 2005. His tombstone is shown at the bottom of this page.

[His siblings included:

a) John Albright: (Married: ?); Born: 21 October 1752 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Died: 25 September 1826 in Madison County, MO; Miscellaneous: Six of his children (5 girls and 1 boy) were baptised at Brick Church, Miscellaneous: The 1800 census listed John with a wife and nine children: 4 boys and 5 girls. (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 1,1984, p. 205 Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt).

b) Anna Barbara Albright: (Married: Elias Powell on November 25, 1777 in Orange County, N.C. ); Born: 1 June 1754 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Died: likely after 1840 census. Miscellaneous: After the Revolution (in which Elias fought on the British side at the battle of Kings Mountain on 7 October 1780), Barbara and her husband moved from Orange County to Burke County. (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 1,1984, p. 223 Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt).

c) Phillip Albright: (Married 1st: Anna Christiana Clapp on October 10, 1780, Married 2nd: Jane Nation) Born: 13 February 1756 in Berks County, Pennsylvania; Died: 22 November 1820. Miscellaneous: He and Christiana had 10 children. Eight were born in North Carolina. Then Phillip took his family to East Tennessee and later to Ohio. (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 1,1984, p. 229-231; Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt).

d) Jacob Albright: (Married 1st: Elenor “Nelley” Holt, daughter of John Holt on 29 April 1784 in Orange County, NC.; Married 2nd: Patsy Simmons, widow of William Simmons on 11 December, 1825 in Madison County, Ga) Born: 8 November 1758 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Died: 4 October, 1839 in Madison County, Georgia; (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 1,1984, p. 254; Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt).

e) Catherine “Caty” Albright: (Married: Jeremiah Holt on 14 April 1784 in Orange Co., N.C.); Born: 15 August 1764 in Orange County, North Carolina. Died: 15 May 1839 in Graham, North Carolina; (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 319 Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt. This Albright source states the record of this family is listed in Chapter II, North Carolina Holt Ancestors under Jeremiah Holt of John Holt I.)

f) George Albright: (Married 1st: ___ Holt; Married 2nd: Mollie May...8 November 1813) (Source: BrickChurchNC-L@rootsweb.com from L H Sherwood. Sherwood's reference was Albright Family by Eula Albright, 1970) Born: 18 January 1766 in Orange County, North Carolina. (George was the 7th child of Ludwig and Anna Albright) Died: 27 August 1835 in Orange (Now Alamance) County, North Carolina (He is buried at The Brick Church Cemetery in Guilford County, Source: p 98 of The Brick Church Records, transcribed by Rev. D.I. Offman, typed and reprinted by Calvin Hinshaw in 1959.) Miscellaneous: Because there were so many "George" Albrights, there is debate among genealogists that information in the Brick Church Records, and other sources about this George is accurate) (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 321-322 Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt;

g) Daniel Albright: (Married: Elizabeth Clapp 9 October 1792, daughter of George Valentine Clapp and Elizabeth Albright); Born: 30 January 1771 in Orange County, North Carolina. Died: 26 April 1843 at 72 y 2 m and 26 d. He is buried at the Brick United Church of Christ Cemetery. Miscellaneous: Daniel was a first cousin, once removed to Elizabeth (his wife). He was a postmaster for about 40 years. He was a member of Frieden's Lutheran Church, but was buried at Brick Church, Guilford Co., possibly because his wife was descended from one of the founding families of Brick Church. At his funeral the minister called him "an excellent man.") Source: The Guilford Genealogist, Published by The Guilford County Genealogical Society of N. C., Vol 23, No.2, Spring 1996, Number 73, p. 66. This publication states that he was an Elder at Brick Church.] (The source of the green is e-mail from Maria Bruce 2005 (mBruce9681@aol.com) (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 336 Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt.)]

Miscellaneous:

Although John was John Ludwick Albright's first name, most documents list him as Ludwick. His brother-in law Sebastian (Boston) Sharp (#97). Sebastian is Ludwick's wife Elizabeth's (#112)'s brother. [Note: John Ludwick Albright, Boston Sharp and Elizabeth Sharp are all G-G-G-G Grandparents of the webmaster]. Ludwick and Elizabeth's daughter Martha Albright married George Albright, the son of Daniel A. Albright (Albrecht) (#109) & Catharine (Catherine) "Katie" (Katy) Loy (#110). [Note: This Daniel and Catharine are also G-G-G-G Grandparents of the webmaster]. (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 294; Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt.)

According to North America, Family Histories, 1500 - 2000 for John Albright, published in Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book of the Charter Members of the DAR Vol 053, Mrs. Clara Albright Chambers, born in Guilford County, N.C., Great Granddaughter of John Albright and Elizabeth stated, "John (1761-1816) enlisted 1782, at the age of twenty-one years serving in the North Carolina troops and was discharged by the commander-in-chief at the close of the war. He died in Orange County, N.C. [Note: According to the pension application filed by Elizabeth, his wife, Ludwick began serving in the Revolutionary War in 1780 and fought in the Battle of Guilford Court House and in the Battle of Lindsey’s Mill. Both these battles took place in 1781, so he enlisted before 1782. The application is shown later on this web page. ] The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Books Record 138,865. DAR ID Number: 163177 states: "John Albright (1761-1816) served as private in the North Carolina troops. He died in Orange County, N.C."

The 1790 U.S. Census Search Results show that two Ludwick Albrights were living in Orange County, North Carolina. They are accounted for on roll M637_7. One of these Ludwicks could be #111. The other could be his father, # 221. [Note: Since Elizabeth married John Ludwick Albright in 1787, she would have been living with Ludwick at the time of this census. He would have been 29 and she would have been 20 years of age.]

The 1800 Orange County, North Carolina census for John Ludwig Albright lists 2 males 0-10 years of age ( Isaac-age 3, Daniel-age 8); 2 males 10 to 16 (George-age 12, John l. - age 15), 1 male 26 to 45 (John Ludwig-age 39), 2 females 0 to 10 (Barbara-age 1, Elizabeth- age 6); 1 female 10 to 16 (Mary-age 10), and 1 female 26 to 45 (Elizabeth Sharp-age 30 years). Three children were born after the 1800 census: Martha (1802), Sarah (1804) and Ludwig (1806). (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 294; Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt.)

In Land Grant Records of North Carolina, Volume I Orange County 1752-1885 by Pat Shaw Baily, 1990, there are files for George Albright (could be John Ludwick Albright’s brother or his cousin, the brother of 99 and 109), Jacob (could be John Ludwick Albright’s brother or cousin and #99’s and 109’s brother), John Albright (could be John Ludwick Albright or his brother or cousin and #99’s and 109’s brother), and Lodowick Albright (could be John Ludwick Albright (#111) or his father Ludwick (Ludwig) (Lodowick) Albright) (#221) . The issue dates of the land grants range from 1779 and 1810. Much of the land was granted to these men along Gun Creek, Haw River, Rock Creek, and the Great Allemance. [Note: Ludwick's will (dated 1816) designates his lands along the Alamance, where he lives, will go to his sons Isaac and Ludwick. Other land had already been given to his sons John, George, and Daniel, but there is no description of the location of those lands in the will].

John and his first wife, Mary Troxier, had two children. The first was John L. Albright. "The second child unnamed, did not live. Mary died during childbirth. From the tombstone at St. Paul's Luthern Church, near Alamance, North Carolina, the inscription said that on 24 Feb., 1787 Mary was buried with her second child in her arms." (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 290; Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt.)

John Ludwick and his second wife, Elizabeth, had 9 children: George, Mary, Daniel, Elizabeth, Isaac, Barbara, Martha, Sarah (#56), and Ludwick.The children of John & Elizabeth "Betsy" Sharp (#112) are listed in Elizabeth's pension application W 5609. This information is copied from an abstract of Revolutionary War Pensions, The North Carolinian, Vol VII, No. 2, Mar., 1961, p. 777." (Source of purple: Ancestry of Albright and Holt Families of Clay County, Missouri Book 2,1984, p. 293; Compiled by Claribel Albright McClain, great granddaughter of Daniel Albright and Amelia Holt.)

John Ludwick Albright wrote his will on April 19, 1816. He died 10 days later. The will can be read in its entirety by clicking here. His tombstone is shown at the bottom of this page.

About 1841, 25 years after his death, Elizabeth Albright, his surviving wife, applied for a pension for his Revolutionary War service. To see the U.S. Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrent Application card, click here.

Below: ~ 1840 Pension Application by Elizabeth Albright for service of of Ludwick Albright, Natl Archives Microseries M804, Roll 24, Application #W5609.Transcribed and annotated by Nancy Poquette.

 

Elizabeth Albright, widow, a resident of Orange County, NC, aged 70 years:
“…She has reason to believe, and does believe that, in the winter or spring of the
year 1780 [this corresponds with the dates in Heitman], that there was a call for a tour of
militia service in behalf of the United States, for three months. That the object of this
draft as this declarant has understood, was to aid the Southern Army under General
LINCOLN. That at the commencement of this tour, O’NEAL was the captain of the
company to which her husband was attached, TROUSDALE was lieutenant and
WILLIAM LYTLE Colonel. They were marched off to the City of Charleston in South
Carolina, but before reaching that place, O’NEAL was made major, and TROUSDALE,
captain. That under these officers her deceased husband, with others, was marched into
Charleston and engaged in fortifying that city against the enemy [29th March to 12th
May, 1780, per Heitman], and according to the best of her recollection and from the
testimony furnished by the affiant, JOHN EFLAND, marked A and hereto annexed. This
declarant has reason to believe that in this tour her husband as private of militia in the
company aforesaid, did serve the United States four months or thereabouts.”

“That at the expiration of this tour, this declarant has always understood, that her
husband served all of the aforesaid tour and was duly discharged therefrom by Captain
TROUSDALE, and returned home. That she has caused search to be made for discharges
but cannot find any.”

“That her husband, the aforesaid LUDWICK ALBRIGHT died in 1816, when all
his papers passed into the hands of his executors, and this declarant does not at this
distant day know anything of them; none were ever returned to her, that she remembers
of. See also affidavit B.”

“This declarant has reason to believe and does believe, that in the winter of 1781,
her deceased husband, the aforesaid LUDWICK ALBRIGHT, did volunteer as private of
militia in the United States service and was attached to TROUSDALE’s company.
HUGH TINNEN was Colonel. This deponent, as well as she remembers, her husband’s
statement corresponds with that of the affiant WILLIAM ALLEN, whose affidavit is
hereto annexed and marked C.”

“Said tour as well as this declarant is informed, commenced on or about the 1st
day of February 1781, and was of three months duration. In this tour, her husband was in
the Battle at the Guilford Courthouse [per Heitman, March 15, 1781], and at the
expiration of said tour, was duly discharged, as she has heard him say, and returned
home.”

“And the said Elizabeth Albright further states upon her said oath that she has
reason to believe, and does believe, that in the summer of the year of 1781, there was a
draft for militia men to serve a three months tour of duty, when her deceased husband, the
aforesaid LUDWICK ALBRIGHT was drafted for said tour. In this tour, WILLIAM
GWINN was Captain, O’NEAL-Major, and JNO. BUTLER-Brigadier General. My
deceased husband in this tour was under ROBERT MEBANE as Colonel, part of the tour,
and was in the engagement at Lindley Mills [per Heitman, September 13, 1781], in the
month of September, of the aforesaid year of 1781. That at the expiration of said tour,
which was of three months duration, my deceased husband was duly discharged by
Captain GWINN and returned home. This tour is proven by the affiant JOHN
STRADER, whose affidavit is hereto annexed and marked D.”

“And the said declarant further stateth upon her said oath that she has reason to
believe and does believe that in the fall of 1782, her deceased husband volunteered as a
private of infantry for a three months tour of duty in the militia in the United States
service. See affidavit E.”

“That ROGERS was Captain of the company to which her husband was attached
and O’NEAL- Colonel. That in this tour she has understood from her deceased husband
that said troops were marched to Sandy Creek in Randolph County; to Drowning
Creek on Pee Dee, where they were stationed some weeks; thence to the Barracks at
Litterell’s Wine? or Whine?. Their three months expired and they returned home, having
been duly discharged, as she has heard her husband say, but by what officer does not now
remember. That in this tour, as in the former, her husband was in legally organized corps
and called into service by competent authority.”

“That from the best information she possesses (derived from her husband and
others) she has reason to believe that as a private of militia in the United States service,
her deceased husband did serve the United States in the War of the Revolution, twelve or
thirteen months in legally organized corps. That in one tour, this declarant remembers of
seeing the said LUDWICK ALBRIGHT as a private soldier in the United States service,
pass by her father’s, in Captain ROGER’s company. This declarant was at that time not
above 10 or 12 years of age. Said LUDWICK ALBRIGHT lived in the same
neighborhood with this declarant’s father and were intimately acquainted. See affidavit
marked E…etc.”

[Deleted are the family-related items, which do not pertain to actual service…
about three pages.]

…“State of North Carolina, Orange County-On this 8th day of December, 1841,
personally appeared before the undersigned acting justice of the peace, in and for the
county of Orange: aforesaid THOMAS BIPPY a resident of said county, aged 77 years,
who being first duly sworn according to law, maketh oath that he was acquainted with the
late LUDWICK ALBRIGHT of the aforesaid county.”

“Deponent states that he knew LUDWICK ALBRIGHT. That when the soldier
left the Guilford Battle [per Heitman, March 15, 1781] and rendezvoused at Ramsour’s
Mill in Chatham County, he then became acquainted with LUDWICK ALBRIGHT.
They then marched to Wake Courthouse and there they stayed until they received their
discharge and come home. Together it was a three months tour. He [ALBRIGHT] did not
serve as cook in this tour, but served as a militia man under the command of General
BUTLER…”

…“B- On the 25th day of November, 1839, personally appeared before the
undersigned, [etc], LUDWICK MAY, a resident of Orange County, aged about 77
years…maketh oath that he was acquainted with the late LUDWICK ALBRIGHT...The
said witness states on oath that he was known to LUDWICK ALBRIGHT being a soldier
in the Revolutionary War. His Captain was GWINN, O’NEAL was his Colonel. He
cannot testify the length of time he served. And further this deponent saith not.”
“C-On this, the 4th day of February 1840, personally appeared [etc], WILLIAM
ALLEN, a resident of the county of Orange, aged 76 years, who [etc] saith that on or
about the 1st of February 1781, he volunteered and did serve a three months tour of duty
in the militia, in the United States service and that said tour ended on or about the first of
May ensuing. That in this tour, this deponent remembers that LUDWICK ALBRIGHT of
the County of Guilford in the state aforesaid, was a private of militia in the United States
service in said tour with us.”

“This deponent remembers the said LUDWICK ALBRIGHT very well. He was
noted in the camp for his great activity. This deponent is under the impression that said
ALBRIGHT was in the same “mess” with him part of the tour, and further saith not.”

“E-On this, the 26th day of February, 1840, personally appeared [etc],
BARNABAS CLAPP, a resident of [Orange] County, aged 76…saith that in the War of
the Revolution as a private soldier in the militia, he served a tour of duty in the fall of
1782 (as well as the deponent remembers), and that in said tour, this deponent remembers
of LUDWICK ALBRIGHT of the aforesaid county as a private in the militia in said tour,
and thinks that said LUDWICK ALBRIGHT was in Captain ROGER’s company and
attached to Colonel O’NEAL’s regiment.”

“This deponent is under the impression he has seen the aforesaid ALBRIGHT out
in other tours in the militia, but does not remember them well enough to particularize,
and further the deponent saith not.”

“A- On this 7th day of March, 1840, personally appeared…John EFLAND a
resident of [Orange] County, aged 77 years, who…maketh oath that in the War of the
Revolution, he served the United States in several tours as private of militia.”

“This deponent further states…that he was intimately acquainted with LUDWICK
ALBRIGHT from his boyhood till the death of said ALBRIGHT. That in the War of the
Revolution, said ALBRIGHT was a good Whig, and this deponent remembers that in the
winter and spring of 1780, he volunteered as a private in the United States service for a
three months tour. When we were marched to the south, William O’NEAL was Captain,
TROUSDALE was Lieutenant, LYTLE-Colonel. O’NEAL returned home before we
marched [to] Charleston in South Carolina. Lay some weeks within 3 or 4 miles of
Charleston, when O’NEAL joined us and had the commission of Major. TROUSDALE
was now made Captain of our company and CAMPBELL was Lieutenant. Was marched
into Charleston and was kept in the service about four months as well as he now
remembers (in his declaration for pension, this deponent may have stated his tour with
more accuracy than at the present day), to which, please refer.”

“In all of which tour, this deponent remembers that the aforesaid LUDWICK
ALBRIGHT of the aforesaid county, now deceased, was a private of infantry in all of
said tour, etc.”

“On the 28th day of March 1840, personally appeared [etc], JOHN STRADER, a
resident of Orange [County] and a U.S. pensioner, aged 82 years…maketh oath that he
was very well acquainted with the late LUDWICK ALBRIGHT…”

“The deponent, as a private soldier in the summer of 1781, was drafted into the
United States service for a three months tour. GWINN was Captain, O’NEAL was major,
BUTLER-Brigadier General (militia). Rendezvoused at O’NEAL’s, in this tour was in
the engagement at Lindley’s Mills [September 13, 1781, per Heitman]. In all of this
three months tour, said LUDWICK ALBRIGHT as a private soldier did serve all of said
three months tour in said company and were all discharged at Colonel O’NEAL’s at the
end of said tour.”

“This deponent does not remember that said LUDWICK ALBRIGHT served in
any other tour with him, that he now remembers, but has understood from said
LUDWICK ALBRIGHT and others that said ALBRIGHT was in a tour in South
Carolina just before the surrender of Charleston in 1780.”

“Said ALBRIGHT had the reputation of being a good Whig and much in the
United States service in the War of the Revolution.

 

 

Below: Photographs of John's tombstone at St. Paul's Lutheran Church Cemetery in Alamance County, North Carolina. (GPS: 36° 1.396 minutes N, 79° 28.689 minutes W). The first photograph shows the original stone "chalked" to permit a more accurate reading of the inscription. Note: John's first name cannot be read on the original stone. Either it has eroded away, or it was never engraved on his stone.

 

 

 

Ludwick
Albright
Was bourn
February: 19: 1761: APRIL
1: 1784: HE WAS MARI
ED: TO MARY: TROXLER
SHE: DIED: FEBRUARY
14: 1787: OCTOBER 2 1787
HE MARRIED: ELIZABETH
SHARP: April 29: 1816
HE DIED: HIS AGE 55 YRS
2 MONTHS 10 DY

 

 

Below: The original stone, and a newer stone. [Note: the new stone states that he died on April 29, 1861. That date is not correct. The date was April 29, 1816 according to the original stone. He was 55 years old at his death, not 100 years old.]

 

 

Lifetime Events Summary for John Ludwick (Ludwig) Albright:

Event
Date
Ludwig's age
Birth
1761
0
Revolutionary War
1775 - 1783
14 - 22
Marriage to First Wife
1784
23
Death of First Wife
1787
26
Marriage to Second Wife
1787
26
Birth of his children
1788 - 1806
27 - 45
Death of Mother
1803
42
Birth of Daughter
1804
43
Death of Father
1810
49
War of 1812
1812 - 1815
51 - 54
Death
1816
55

 

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Contact person for this website is Susan Snyder: susanleachsnyder@gmail.com